gear machining

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mark poulson
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gear machining

Postby mark poulson » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:27 pm

Can the same equipment and setups be used for manufacturing brass gears as is used to manuf. alum. gears?

fishonsc
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Re: gear machining

Postby fishonsc » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:30 pm

Yes. The feed and speed will be different. Aluminum is softer then brass. Plus brass is abrasive. Your cutting tools will break down faster with brass.

mark poulson
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Re: gear machining

Postby mark poulson » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:47 pm

fishonsc wrote:Yes. The feed and speed will be different. Aluminum is softer then brass. Plus brass is abrasive. Your cutting tools will break down faster with brass.


Thanks.
I thought the aluminum used for baitcaster main gears was harder than the brass used in main gears, and that way why brass gears seem so much smoother.
Are the aluminum gears hardened after they are manufactured?

hoohoorjoo
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Re: gear machining

Postby hoohoorjoo » Tue Jul 10, 2018 6:50 pm

mark poulson wrote:
fishonsc wrote:Yes. The feed and speed will be different. Aluminum is softer then brass. Plus brass is abrasive. Your cutting tools will break down faster with brass.


Thanks.
I thought the aluminum used for baitcaster main gears was harder than the brass used in main gears, and that way why brass gears seem so much smoother.
Are the aluminum gears hardened after they are manufactured?

The aluminum gears are tempered on most reels-that is, if the reel is designed to last for more than 1 season. :lol: Some are just anodized to make the outer surface harder by concentrating molecules there. The best is a combination of high-tensile 7000 series aluminum alloy, then hard-anodizing the gear after machining.
Try not to let your mind wander. It is much too small to be outside unsupervised.

mark poulson
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Re: gear machining

Postby mark poulson » Tue Jul 10, 2018 8:23 pm

hoohoorjoo wrote:
mark poulson wrote:
fishonsc wrote:Yes. The feed and speed will be different. Aluminum is softer then brass. Plus brass is abrasive. Your cutting tools will break down faster with brass.


Thanks.
I thought the aluminum used for baitcaster main gears was harder than the brass used in main gears, and that way why brass gears seem so much smoother.
Are the aluminum gears hardened after they are manufactured?

The aluminum gears are tempered on most reels-that is, if the reel is designed to last for more than 1 season. :lol: Some are just anodized to make the outer surface harder by concentrating molecules there. The best is a combination of high-tensile 7000 series aluminum alloy, then hard-anodizing the gear after machining.


Thanks.

Strewth
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Re: gear machining

Postby Strewth » Wed Jul 11, 2018 12:30 am

Seems to be hit or miss with alloy gears. The micro gears in my 13 Metanium developed an annoying 'buzz' very quickly with use, while the alloy gears in both my Steez A reels are liquid smooth after heavy use and dozens of large barramundi. Using a Curado K brass drive gear and a stock pinion in the Met transformed it into a super smooth reel.


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